Issue 35: Aesop’s Fables

Many schools are studying Ancient Greeks this term, as a link to the Olympic Games. I have always found this a fairly tricky topic to follow in music, but it ocurred to me that Aesop’s fables might prove a useful source of inspiration.

Wikipedia states that these fables are credited to a slave called Aesop, believed to have lived in Greece between 620 and 650 BC. There are various other theories about Aesop’s nationality; you can read about this at both the sites listed below. The aesops-fables site has a huge collection of fables listed. Some will be very familiar, others less well-known.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aesop’s_Fables

http://www.aesops-fables.org.uk/

It would be fairly simple to create sounds to accompany a reading, or performance of the stories, or even a whole composition. Here are a few ideas to start with;

The hare and the tortoise; tempo  http://www.aesops-fables.org.uk/aesop-fable-the-hare-and-the-tortoise.htm

The Wind and the Sun; timbre and dynamics http://www.aesops-fables.org.uk/aesop-fable-the-wind-and-the-sun.htm

http://www.aesops-fables.org.uk/aesop-fable-the-lion-and-the-mouse.htm; pitch, timbre, dynamics

 

 

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