Issue 137: Skeleton Wider Opportunities Planning

This is my skeleton plan for the first four weeks of a Wider Opportunities Programme. My objectives are to establish the ground rules, and get the children playing their instruments as quickly as possible. I think it is too, too cruel to set out all those shiny instruments in front of the children and make them wait ages before they can get their hands on them! 

Date

Session

Teaching Activities National Curriculum Objectives Review
 

Session  1

Welcome and Introduction (keep it short)

About the programme, behaviour expectations

Pulse/Rhythm Warm-up

Concentration game level 1

“Stay Home” from Shrek1 – copy movements in time to pulse

Song

Vocal warm-up – relaxing the jaw, sirening, “coo-ee”

“Rabbit run on the frozen field” teach by rote, listen and copy

Instruments

Introduction (keep it short)

How to Play

Suitable warm-up (eg breathing, finger exercises)

First lesson on playing (probably listen and copy)

Packing away

1a sing  

1b play

1c rehearse/perform

2a improvise

2b explore/structure

3a analyse

3b explore/express

3c improve

4a listen

4b elements

4c notation

4d time and place

 
 

Session  2

Welcome

Pulse/RhythmWarm-up

Concentration game level 2

“Stay Home” from Shrek1 – copy movements in time to pulse let children lead

Song

Vocal warm-up – relaxing the jaw, sirening, “coo-ee”

“Rabbit run on the frozen field” teach by rote, listen and copy, call and response

Instruments

Introduction (keep it short)

How to Play

Suitable warm-up (eg breathing, finger exercises)

Revise first lesson and move on

Packing away

1a sing  

1b play

1c rehearse/perform

2a improvise

2b explore/structure

3a analyse

3b explore/express

3c improve

4a listen

4b elements

4c notation

4d time and place

 
 

Session  3

Welcome

Pulse/Rhythm Warm-up

Concentration game – playing the game properly

Switch game – let child lead

Song

Vocal warm-up – relaxing the jaw, sirening, “coo-ee”

Start teaching a suitable round, eg “You can’t put your muck in our dustbin” or “si, si si, si dolada”

Instruments

Suitable warm-up (eg breathing, finger exercises)

Continue as appropriate for instrument

Packing away

1a sing  

1b play

1c rehearse/perform

2a improvise

2b explore/structure

3a analyse

3b explore/express

3c improve

4a listen

4b elements

4c notation

4d time and place

 
 

Session  4

Welcome

Pulse/Rhythm Warm-up

Concentration game – playing the game properly

Switch game- let child lead

Song

Vocal warm-up – relaxing the jaw, sirening, “coo-ee”

Start teaching a suitable round, eg “You can’t put your muck in our dustbin” or “si, si si, si dolada”

Instruments

Suitable warm-up (eg breathing, finger exercises)

Continue as appropriate for instrument

Packing away

1a sing  

1b play

1c rehearse/perform

2a improvise

2b explore/structure

3a analyse

3b explore/express

3c improve

4a listen

4b elements

4c notation

4d time and place

 

 The items in the “National Curriculum” column refer to the old, detailed curriculum, which I have summarised for myself here:

National Curriculum

 

National Curriculum Programme of Study (summary)
1a Sing in unison and parts with diction, control of pitch, sense of phrase and expression
1b Play instruments with control and rhythmic accuracy
1c Practise, rehearse and present performances with awareness of audience
2a Improvise, develop rhythmic and melodic material when performing
2b Explore, choose, combine and organise musical ideas within musical structures
3a Analyse and compare sounds
3b Explore and explain own ideas and feelings about music using movement, dance, expressive language and vocabulary
3c Improve their own and others’ work in relation to its intended effect
4a Listen with attention to detail, internalise and recall sounds with increasing accuracy
4b How pitch, duration, dynamics, timbre, texture and silence can be organised within structures to communicate
4c How music is produced in different ways and described through established and invented notations
4d How time and place can influence the way music is created, performed and heard

 I highlight the items that are covered in the lessons. For the first sessions, I’m not too concerned to introduce notation, and I’m also laid back about the composing, improvising, and listening to music areas. There’s plenty of time to look at other areas in the future.

I’ll be fleshing out this skeleton with descant recorders, ukuleles, djembe and samba this term, for years 3, 4, 5 and 6. After four weeks, the difference in age, and the demands of the instruments will make themselves apparent, and I’ll have to adapt accordingly.

Leaves

 

 

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